PRESERVE WILDLIFE

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WHAT WE DO

The Dale Hollow Lake Marina Operator’s Association in cooperation with the Friends of Dale Hollow Lake The camera will be installed by one of this project’s strongest supporters, Twin Lakes Telephone Cooperative and will provide 24/7 Live Video feeds from a nest that has produced over 12 baby eagles in the past six years.

RECENT VIDEOS

The Dale Hollow Lake Marina Operator’s Association constantly monitors the activity of our eagles using high end cameras. Through these cameras, we were able to protect and preserve the eagles. See the recent videos captured by our camera.

FAQS ABOUT BALD EAGLES

YOUNG BALD EAGLES AREN'T BALD.

So obviously adult bald eagles aren’t really bald, either—their heads have bright white plumage that contrasts with their dark body feathers, giving them a “bald” look. But young bald eagles have mostly brown heads. In fact, for the first four or five years of their lives, they move through a complicated series of different plumage patterns; in their second year, for instance, they have white bellies.

BALD EAGLES SOUND SO SILLY THAT HOLLYWOOD DUBS OVER THEIR VOICES.

It’s a scene you’ve probably seen countless times in movies and on TV: An eagle flies overhead and emits a rough, piercing scream. It’s a classic symbol of wilderness and adventure. The only problem? Bald eagles don’t make that sound.

Instead, they emit a sort of high-pitched giggle or a weak scream. These noises are so unimpressive that Hollywood sound editors often dub over bald eagle calls with far more impressive sounds: the piercing, earthy screams of a smaller bird, the red-tailed hawk. If you were a fan of The Colbert Report, you might remember the show’s iconic CGI eagle from the opener—it, too, is making that red-tailed hawk cry. Listen for yourself and decide who sounds more impressive.

BALD EAGLES USUALLY MATE FOR LIFE

It’s a scene you’ve probably seen countless times in movies and on TV: An eagle flies overhead and emits a rough, piercing scream. It’s a classic symbol of wilderness and adventure. The only problem? Bald eagles don’t make that sound.

Instead, they emit a sort of high-pitched giggle or a weak scream. These noises are so unimpressive that Hollywood sound editors often dub over bald eagle calls with far more impressive sounds: the piercing, earthy screams of a smaller bird, the red-tailed hawk. If you were a fan of The Colbert Report, you might remember the show’s iconic CGI eagle from the opener—it, too, is making that red-tailed hawk cry. Listen for yourself and decide who sounds more impressive.

THEY LIVE PRETTY LONG LIVES

Those romantic partnerships are even more impressive because bald eagles can survive for decades. In 2015, a wild eagle in Henrietta, New York, died at the record age of 38. Considering that these birds pair up at 4 or 5 years of age, that’s a lot of Valentine’s Days.

THEY HOLD THE RECORD FOR THE LARGEST BIRD'S NEST

Bald eagles build enormous nests high in the treetops. The male and female work on the nest together, and this quality time helps them cement their lifelong bond. Their cozy nurseries consist of a framework of sticks lined with softer stuff such as grass and feathers. If the nest serves them well during the breeding season, they’ll keep using it year after year. And, like all homeowners, they can’t resist the thought of renovating and adding to their abode. Every year, they’ll spruce it up with a whopping foot or two of new material.

FEMALES ARE LARGER THAN MALES

In many animal species, males are (on average) larger than females. Male gorillas, for example, dwarf their female counterparts. But for most birds of prey, it’s the opposite. Male bald eagles weigh about 25 percent less than females.

Scientists aren’t sure why there’s such a size difference. One reason might be the way they divide up their nesting duties. Females take the lead in arranging the nesting material, so being bigger might help them take charge. Also, they spend longer incubating the eggs than males, so their size could intimidate would-be egg thieves.

THEY'RE UNIQUELY NORTH AMERICAN

You’ve probably heard of America’s other eagle: the golden eagle. This bird lives throughout much of the northern hemisphere. But the bald eagle is only found in North America. It lives across much of Canada and the U.S., as well as northern parts of Mexico.

Though it may be North American, the bald eagle has seven close relatives that are found throughout the world. They all belong to the genus Haliaeetus, which comes—pretty unimaginatively—from the Latin words for “sea” and “eagle.” One relative, the African fish eagle, is a powerful symbol in its own right. It represents several countries; for example, it’s the national symbol of Zambia, and graces the South Sudanese, Malawian, and Namibian coats of arms.

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YOU CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE

The Dale Hollow Lake Marina Operator’s Association in cooperation with the Friends of Dale Hollow Lake are seeking support to install a Live High Definition Camera on one of Dale Hollow Lake’s American Bald Eagle’s Nest. The Marina Association will match the first $5,000.00 raised to push this effort half way toward the ultimate goal of $20,000.00. The funding will be used to install electric service and fiber optic service to the camera which will be mounted high above Dale Hollow Lake overlooking one of the lake’s active American Bald Eagle’s Nests. The camera will be installed by one of this project’s strongest supporters, Twin Lakes Telephone Cooperative and will provide 24/7 Live Video feeds from a nest that has produced over 12 baby eagles in the past six years. A Dale Hollow Lake American Bald Eagle Web-Site will be produced where interested viewers can watch the various stages of the eagle’s life such as nest building, egg laying, egg hatching, and eagle fledging. This project is a cooperative, non-profit educational opportunity for the Upper Cumberland and Dale Hollow Lake Region. The camera will be installed and tested in late summer of 2016

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About Dale Hollow

The Dale Hollow Lake Marina Operator’s Association in cooperation with the Friends of Dale Hollow Lake.

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5274 Bradford Hicks Dr. Livingston, TN 38570

Contact No.: 931-823-2781

Email us: info@daleholloweaglecam.com

Ofice Hours: Mon-Fri 8am – 5pm